November 13, 2014

WASHINGTON – The Information Technology Industry Council (ITI), the global voice for the tech industry, representing 60 of the world’s leading technology companies, issued the following statement from President and CEO Dean Garfield urging members of the Senate to pass the bipartisan USA FREEDOM Act (S. 2685) introduced by Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT):

"The reforms included in Sen. Leahy's USA FREEDOM Act are urgently needed.  The U.S. surveillance revelations are having a corrosive impact on the public’s trust in our government and on perceptions of the independence of U.S. technology companies.  Without action, not only are American jobs at risk, so is the open and borderless internet upon which our innovation economy relies. By effectively ending bulk collection and allowing companies to be more transparent about the orders they receive, we can ensure that consumer confidence is restored. The choice couldn’t be more clear and we strongly urge the Senate to seize this opportunity and pass surveillance reform without further delay.”

ITI has been working diligently to build consensus and momentum in Congress to pass meaningful surveillance reform.  In September, ITI led a multi-association letter of support for Sen. Leahy’s USA FREEDOM Act. Previously, ITI President Garfield testified before committees in the Senate and the House of Representatives urging lawmakers to pass reforms critical to restore public trust and stem the negative economic implications for the technology sector in the wake of the Snowden revelations.

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About ITI. The Information Technology Industry Council (ITI) is the premier advocacy and policy organization for the world’s leading innovation companies.  ITI navigates the relationships between policymakers, companies, and non-governmental organizations, providing creative solutions that advance the development and use of technology around the world. Visit www.itic.org to learn more. Follow us on Twitter for the latest ITI news and other alerts: @ITI_TechTweets

Public Policy Tags: Data & Privacy, Surveillance Reform